НОВОСТИ
Like

Lost In Time: The Abandoned City Of Pripyat (photos)

Сентябрь 6, 2015    
Lost In Time: The Abandoned City Of Pripyat (photos)

 

Desolate hospitals, abandoned homes and scattered, broken possessions are all that is left of the once-thriving Soviet town of Pripyat.

 

The town of 50,000 residents was once hailed as being a vision of the future, with progressive town-planning and modern architecture.

 

But nearly 30 years ago, all that came to a sudden and violent end.

 

The town of Pripyat, in Ukraine, sprang up just three kilometres from the country’s first nuclear power plant to house scientists and workers serving the plant, and security troops.

 

But on April 26 1986, one of the reactors deep inside the Chernobyl power plant went into meltdown, sparking the world’s worst nuclear disaster. 

 

 

 

 

Desolate remains: Photographer Roland Verant, 35, from Vienna, captured a series of stunning images of the Ukrainian town of Pripyat, 30 years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster that decimated the town

Desolate remains: Photographer Roland Verant, 35, from Vienna, captured a series of stunning images of the Ukrainian town of Pripyat, 30 years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster that decimated the town

 

Remains of a life: The once-bustling town of Pripyat sprang up just three kilometres from Ukraine's first nuclear power plant, which exploded on April 26 1986

 

Remains of a life: The once-bustling town of Pripyat sprang up just three kilometres from Ukraine's first nuclear power plant, which exploded on April 26 1986

 

Sinister: Pripyat is still a no-go zone because of the high levels of radiation, but graffiti artists have broken the rules and used the abandoned town as a blank canvas

 

Sinister: Pripyat is still a no-go zone because of the high levels of radiation, but graffiti artists have broken the rules and used the abandoned town as a blank canvas

 

No-go zone: It wasn't until the next day that the government realised the extent of the disaster, and ordered the evacuation of the town's 50,000 residents 

No-go zone: It wasn't until the next day that the government realised the extent of the disaster, and ordered the evacuation of the town's 50,000 residents 

 

Ghost town: The scientists, workers and military personnel that staffed the power plant upped and left, taking their families with them, but leaving behind almost all their possessions

 

Ghost town: The scientists, workers and military personnel that staffed the power plant upped and left, taking their families with them, but leaving behind almost all their possession

 

School's out: Most had no idea they would never return to the town that they had once called home, before the world's worst nuclear disaster struck

School's out: Most had no idea they would never return to the town that they had once called home, before the world's worst nuclear disaster struck

 

Left behind: The series of photographs reveal what Pripyat has now become, nearly 30 years after the disaster that forced the evacuation of 50,000 residents

Left behind: The series of photographs reveal what Pripyat has now become, nearly 30 years after the disaster that forced the evacuation of 50,000 residents

Abandoned: Chernobyl was Soviet Ukraine's first nuclear power plant, but on April 26 1986, a reactor deep inside the plant went into meltdown

 

Abandoned: Chernobyl was Soviet Ukraine's first nuclear power plant, but on April 26 1986, a reactor deep inside the plant went into meltdown

Normally a no-go zone, one photographer has braved the sky-high levels of radiation to capture a series of astonishing images of what the once-bustling town has become.

Amateur photographer Roland Verant, 35, first visited the site five years ago, but has felt compelled to return seven times since.

A clerk for an insurance business in Vienna, he has now spent a total of 42 days in the exclusion zone.

 

‘I was assured that I would not be taken to the dangerously “hot” places and that a competent guide would be equipped with a Geiger counter on the trip, so I wouldn’t need to worry as long as I followed some basic rules,’ he said.

 

The zone can prove fatal if these strict rules aren’t followed.

 

Her stunning photographs reveal the extent of the deterioration of the town since the disaster, as nature how slowly claimed the site. 

 

2ADF64CB00000578-0-image-a-45_1437996570817

Growing again: Nature has reclaimed the once-thriving city, that was hailed as a vision of the future with progressive town-planning and modern architecture

2ADF648700000578-0-image-a-47_1437996576197

Rusted: The town was even home to a fairground, complete with bumper cars and a Ferris wheel to entertain the families of the workers

2ADF648300000578-0-image-a-49_1437996584928

Then and now: Photographer Roland Verant, from Vienna, holds up a photograph of the power plant after the explosion on April 26 1986 against a backdrop of the plant as it stands today

2ADF647B00000578-0-image-a-51_1437996591350

Shattered: Buildings today still stand as they were left during the emergency evacuation, with paint peelings and glass long gone from the windows

2ADF64E300000578-0-image-a-53_1437996598511

Peeling paint: Families were forced to abandon their homes during the government evacuation, which lasted just three hours, on the day following the explosion

2ADF677D00000578-0-image-a-55_1437996605038

In the frame: Photographer Roland Verant (pictured), from Vienna, managed to gain access to the no-go site, accompanied by a trained guide

2ADF644700000578-0-image-a-56_1437996611440

Lives left behind: Families were forced to leave nearly all of their possessions behind when the town was evacuated. Today, houses still stand with food in the cupboards and sheets on the unmade beds

 

2ADF644D00000578-0-image-a-59_1437996616824

Devastation: Masks litter the floor of the factory in the ghost town that Pripyat has become since the disaster, nearly 30 years ago

2ADF647300000578-0-image-a-61_1437996628894

Families at play: An abandoned swimming pool remains, with layers of dust over the diving board and pool where workers and their families once played

2ADF646700000578-0-image-a-63_1437996635328

Signs of life: Footprints in the layers of dust that now cover the town's swimming pool, evidence that it was once a place that thousands of people called home

 

2ADF646F00000578-0-image-a-64_1437996643621

Lookout: Shattered glass and fragments of furniture litter the floor, with a view looking out over the ghost town that Pripyat has become

2ADF64D700000578-0-image-a-67_1437996654382

Overcast: An abandoned boat lies in a lake in the town. Russia, Ukraine and Belarus suffered the worst of the contamination from the blast, but increased radiation levels were detected across Europe.

2ADF66B900000578-0-image-a-68_1437996664062

Damaged decorations: The red paint on a balcony flakes off, as nature reclaims the Pripyat site, where factory workers lived with their families 

2ADF645B00000578-0-image-a-70_1437996669756

Ground to a halt: A Ferris wheel had been erected in the town, due to be opened to the public in May. But the explosion put an end to the plans

2ADF67B800000578-0-image-a-72_1437996685555

Back to nature: The sun sets over Pripyat, in Ukraine, with the town's much-anticipated Ferris wheel in the foreground

2ADF679500000578-0-image-a-75_1437996692746

Shell of a town: Although the external structures of buildings still stand, the insides are littered with broken glass, fragments of furniture, and the remnants of the lives of people who called Pripyat home

2ADF677000000578-3176005-image-a-55_1438004045390

Strangely beautiful: The sun shines over the trees of Pripyat, which has slowly been reclaimed by nature in the 30 years since the catastrophe

2ADF645700000578-0-image-a-33_1437996525454

Desolate remains: Photographer Roland Verant, 35, from Vienna, captured a series of stunning images of the Ukrainian town of Pripyat, 30 years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster that decimated the town

2ADF64DB00000578-0-image-a-34_1437996525695

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Remains of a life: The once-bustling town of Pripyat sprang up just three kilometres from Ukraine's first nuclear power plant, which exploded on April 26 1986

 

Коментарии

Коментарии

Подпишитесь на нашу рассылку новостей.

закрытьX